nuclear ban

Nuclear Now Clear 

Montenegrin Open Science Days 2015

Visit the "Nuclear Now Clear" Symposium and meet emerging international experts from the fields of Nuclear, Particle and Subparticle Physics!

Supporting Montenegrin initiatives dedicated to advancement of science and scientific research is one of the principal aspirations of OMSA. OMSA does this by employing its international membership network to gather and convey information and by connecting experts with interested individuals, paving the way for local initiatives in Montenegro. We are therefore eager to actively support the Open Science Days (ODN’15), the largest science promotion event in Montenegro, traditionally organized by the Ministry of Science. The proposed short symposium is another, direct way to facilitate the exchange of ideas and experiences between the Montenegrin society and a global community of research professionals, including some of the leading research institutes and universities. 

Every year the symposium introduces the youth and interested professionals in Montenegro to the current trends, findings and innovations in a scientific discipline or an industry that has a global relevance, but that is still underrepresented in Montenegro. We present the currently pursued challenges along with the ideas for the future developments in that concrete domain. Most importantly, OMSA uses this opportunity to go beyond the primarily stereotypical impressions and misconceptions that most people have about an exotic scientific discipline and to break taboos. In the previous years we addressed Space Studies and Neuroscience, and this year we deal with the results and ideas from experimental particle physics.

Furthermore, OMSA wants to raise the awareness amongst the Montenegrin youth, in particular, that there exists a great number of opportunities for them to pursue exotic scientific disciplines and research, despite the fact that it is underrepresented in their homeland. Nuclear research can unlock enormous potential for economic development, and in societies where know-how is combined with the rule of law, the economic possibilities can be compared to those experienced in the pharmaceutical industry.

The symposium is one example of international cooperation that brings expertise and innovative ideas as main contributions to the formation of a society ready to seize development opportunities.

 

Thu, Sept 24, 6pm, Digitalizuj.me Auditorium, Maša Djurovića 3/1


Speakers

Ranko Toskovic copy
Ranko Tošković

PhD Candidate, TU Delft
The Netherlands

 

Magnetism -- atom by atom

Ranko Toskovic’s research revolves around magnetism at the atomic scale. To this end, he employs a low Scanning Tunneling Microscope to visualize single magnetic atoms and move them around on a solid surface forming different one- and two-dimensional atomic structures in such a way: literally atom-by-atom! Magnetic properties of those atoms and atomic structures are then investigated using the same microscope. Gaining insight into these basic magnetic lattices can lead to a better understanding of much more complex magnetic materials on the macroscopic scale. 


Natasa Lalovic copy
Natasa Lalovic

PhD candidate, Lund University

Sweden

 

Protons and Neutrons: Our Extreme-sports Hero

Nataša Lalović's research in the field of nuclear physics is centered around gamma spectroscopy as a reliable probe of nuclear structure. Alongside many researchers, Nataša is taking part in performance of numerous complex experimental campaigns addressing different questions: How do nuclei behave at extreme proton and neutron numbers, how do these numbers affect the shape/appearance of the nuclei and what can we deduce about the strong nuclear force, being one of the four fundamental interactions. Most of the experimental activities requested by this specific topic may be performed only at a few laboratories in the world, requiring state-of-the-art detector systems. Nataša's efforts are therefore directed towards a large array of germanium detectors which are capable of tracking gamma rays as they pass through the medium - AGATA.


Linus Ros
Linus Ros

PhD candidate, Lund University

Sweden

 

Hydrogen microscopy in Astrogeological material

Isotopic measurements of extraterrestrial material collected at Earth provide a way to compare the degree of mixing of the primordial molecules among different solar system material. In this work Linus Ros will present and discuss the results from a measurement on samples from the Tagish Lake meteorite, which is suggested to be one of the most primitive solar system material yet studied and an evaluation of the technique, with results of measurements on a geological standard.


vicky
Victoria Vedia Fernandez

PhD Candidate, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain

 

Exotic Nuclei and the Stories They Tell about Nature

Victoria Vedia's research is based on Nuclear Physics with Astrophysics application. She works in production of exotic nuclei that can not be easily found in nature. These nuclei take part in reactions that take plase in the stars or have happened in the Big Bang. In order to produce them she does work in big facilities like ISOLDE in CERN or nuclear reactors ILL in Grenoble.


masa
Maša Šćepanović

PhD candidate, Universidad Carlos III

Spain

Steel embrace

Masa Scepanovic's research is focused on the ion irradiation effects on oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels for application in fusion reactors. The operating temperature for steels for structural applications in nuclear fusion reactors can be significantly raised by reinforcing these steels with a homogeneous dispersion of hard particles (usually yttria). 

slavica
Slavica Ivanović

Research engineer, Commissariat a l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives

Paris, France

 

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Insight

Slavica Ivanovic's research is in the area of experimental nuclear reactors from those that are being prepared for decommissioning to the operating ones. On Ulysse reactor, she has performed study in dose rate measurements for decommissioning operations in different scenarios and using several software solutions. All this was in accordance with ALARA principles. After she focused her research on ISIS where she was a part of the team performing experiments on the nuclear reactor operation principles in INSTN, Saclay.


Abstracts

magnetism
Ranko Tošković

 

Magnetism -- atom by atom

Will two magnets attract or repel each other, and what is the intensity with which they do it? Is their interaction strong enough to form a long-term stable structure? To obtain the answers to these and many other questions regarding magnetism of such materials we have to zoom-in into their nanoscopic structure. Atoms that build a material determine its magnetic properties. Using a special type of microscope (ie. Scanning Tunnelling Microscope), we can actually see individual atoms, and not only that - we can move those atoms and in such a way make structures of various sizes and shapes. Atom by atom!

These atoms and structures built out of them, can be measured using the same microscope we employed to physically create them. If this fascinating instrument is used in combination with magnetic atoms, not only do we get a unique opportunity to gain insight into the magnetism of single atoms, but also to create (nano-) magnets, starting from the simplest example - a chain of two atoms of the same chemical element - to much more complex one- and two-dimensional structures. In this way, controlling the complexity of the magnetic structure with atomic precision, we learn more about magnetism at the level at which is created, but also how it develops with increasing size, which allows for a better understanding, and consequently prediction of the behavior of magnets that we can see with our own eyes without mediation of the above mentioned microscope.


protons
Nataša Lalović

Protons and Neutrinos: Our Extreme-sports Hero

Just like some humans need that adrenaline boost in the ever more popular extreme sports, we give a similar feeling to our nuclei.  You certainly remember: an atom has a nucleus, filled with protons and neutrons, and electrons, somewhat further away from the nucleus. We are all about understanding the structure of atomic nuclei. And if we choose to do so, the odds are we will get more information out of those tiny things if we consider them in extreme scenarios, where their key characteristics are tested. How do they behave if the numbers of protons and numbers are way different from what they (nuclei) are used to? How do they look like and why is their ‘appearance’ important anyway? How can we look inside?

We make use of gamma-ray spectroscopy. We observe the gamma rays, which our confused nuclei emit after experiencing that adrenalin shock/boost. And we have some amazing tools to do that. The most sophisticated of the kind, to be more precise. And our ‘work horse’ is called AGATA (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array). So I will draw a simplified picture of how this is done and tell you which nucleus we very much rely on. And then, you will be ready to hear how this can let us peek into some elements that stars didn’t actually leave behind.But there is more to it. We do have fun while doing all this.  We are, however, also aware of the fact, that the projects we are working on also interfere with very interesting applications, based on gamma imaging, such as tumor diagnosis and therapy, homeland security.


microscopy
Linus Ros

 

Hydrogen microscopy in Astrogeological material

Clues to understanding the evolution of the Solar System are scattered all around in the form of, among other objects, the primitive meteorites, and one of the key challenges in experimental physics is to devise scientific techniques that can help us track and interpret this billions of years long process. Primitive meteorites are of great interest primarily because they typically show elevated deuterium/hydrogen ratios compared to terrestrial material. It is believed that this is due to the preservation of the organic molecules which were formed in the presolar molecular cloud. Isotopic measurements of extraterrestrial material collected at Earth provide a way to compare the degree of mixing of the primordial molecules among different solar system material.

In recent years a quantitative technique for D/H-ratio microscopy has been developed at Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF). The technique is derived from the proton-proton scattering technique and has been proven to have the same beneficial features to considerably advance the current exploration. The Tagish Lake meteorite, which fell in 2000 on to the Tagish Lake region in the British Columbia, Canada, is suggested to be one of the most primitive solar system material yet studied. In this work we present and discuss the results from a measurement on samples from the Tagish Lake meteorite, and we aim to engage the audience into the ways in which we interpret the history of our closest stellar neighborhood.


exotic
Victoria Vedia Fernandez

 

Exotic Nuclei and the Stories They Tell about Nature

How do stars form and evolve? How chemical elements were created and where? What are the fundamental laws and building blocks of Nature? These essential questions have alwaysintrigued humanity, and answering them is one of the most sought challenges in Physics today.Exotic nuclei, which due to their short radioactive lives are not found on Earth, are key elements for the understanding of these questions.

Early in the 20th century, scientists realized that exotic nuclei take part in the nuclear reactionsthat happen in stars, the Universe cauldrons, explaining the brightness of the stars and thecreation of heavy elements from lighter ones. Besides, they are important elements tounderstand stars evolution, they also tell us about the origin of elements and their abundanceson Earth. The oxygen that forms water or the carbon present in -DNA-, were both producedthrough stellar reactions. Exotic nuclei studies also provide important information about thefundamental laws and symmetries that govern Nature.  Furthermore, they are used in medicalapplications like cancer treatment and diagnosis. Since exotic nuclei are not present on Earth,and their study would provide valuable knowledge, they are produced in special facilities likeISOLDE-CERN, one of the world-leading laboratories for production and investigation of exotic nuclei.In this talk, I will explain what exotic nuclei are, along with their implication in science and the state-of-the-art of its production and study at ISOLDE-CERN.


steel
Maša Šćepanović

 

 

Steel embrace

Nuclear fusion is a process of binding lighter elements into a new, heavier one, during which huge amount of energy is released. In the beginning of 20th century this process has been flagged as a potential energy source. Considering that our energy sources have been almost completely depleted, fusion is one of the most attractive scientific and engineering challenges, strongly motivated by the fact that great amount of energy is produced without emission of gasses, completely safe and with almost inexhaustible resources.
 
Nuclear fusion requires extreme temperatures (about 100 million degrees, which is in average 6 times higher than the temperature in the core of the Sun). At this temperature the electrons are separated from the nucleus and the gas becomes a plasma that is retained in the reactor by using the magnetic field.One of the components of research in the field of nuclear fusion is also working on improving structural materials that will be used in the areas closest to the plasma. These materials have to withstand very high levels of damage caused by radiation, retention of light atoms that are the result of transmutations and high temperatures as a result of fusion reaction.
fuelcycle
Slavica Ivanović

 

 

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Insight

The nuclear fuel cycle starts with the mining of uranium and ends with the disposal of nuclear waste. To prepare uranium for use in a nuclear reactor, it undergoes the steps of mining and milling, conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication. These steps make up the 'front end' of the nuclear fuel cycle. After uranium has spent about three years in a reactor to produce electricity, the used fuel may undergo a further series of steps including temporary storage, reprocessing, and recycling before wastes are disposed. Collectively these steps are known as the 'back end' of the fuel cycle.
 

Research reactors comprise a wide range of civil and commercial nuclear reactors which are generally not used for power generation. ISIS research reactor is located on the CEA Saclay site. It belongs to the same nuclear facility as OSIRIS reactor. Both reactors are open core pool type reactors and exhibit the same core characteristics. However, from the thermo-hydraulic point of view, ISIS reactor has a nominal power of 700 kW, while OSIRIS can be operated up to 70 MW. A large panel of experiments have been developed for the education and training programs organized by the INSTN. Some of those experiments are: survey of the core reactivity during fuel loading, approach to criticality, reactor start up, study of the influence of devices placed on the core reactivity. Every year, about 400 trainees participate to the training courses on ISIS reactor. The feedback obtained from the trainee's shows that the training courses carried on a research reactor ensure a comprehensive understanding of the reactor principle and operation that cannot be gained only with theoretical courses associated with the use of simulators.


Poziv za partnerstvo

Poziv za partnerstvo 

Partneri

Ministarstvo nauke Vlade Crne Gore

mn

Digitalizuj.Me

mn 


Izvršni direktor, v.d.

Koordinator za projektne događaje 

sasa
 

Aleksandar Jaćimović

Jovana Gvozdenović 

 


Reklama 

Kontakt

OMSA

Aleksandar Jaćimović

(NL) 31 15 27 89 376
(NL) 31 62 500 26 24
(MNE) 382 67 549 972

a.s.jacimovic@omsa.me

 OCSI

Jovana Gvozdenović

(MNE) +

 

jovana.gvozdenovic@omsa.me

 

Prethodni događaji

 

Otvoreni dani nauke 2013

Dragos Bratasanu 
Link za video

Jessica Falahaut 
Link za video

Guzel Kamaletdinova 
Link za video

Michael Johnson 
Link za video

Ashley Dale 
Link za video

 

Otvoreni dani nauke 2014

Merina Su 
Link za video

Nuno Loureiro
Link za video

Elena Sugis
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Anne Urai 
Link za video

Nikola Vuković
Link za video